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100-year-old great-great-grandmother sets world record as oldest female competitive powerlifter

100-year-old great-great-grandmother sets world record as oldest female competitive powerlifter

She only started lifting weights after turning 91 years old.

Her addiction to applause has made 100-year-old Edith Murway-Traina a true champ in the weightlifting arena. Coming from Tampa, Florida, the powerlifting great-great-grandmother celebrated her 100th birthday on August 8, 2021, and she proudly carries the Guinness World Records title for the oldest competitive powerlifter (female).

For somebody who only started weightlifting at the age of 91, Edith proves that she's a force to reckon with when she's around a set of weights. She took up weightlifting as a hobby at first, and now, she can deadlift 165 pounds and bench press 65 pounds. And most of all, she makes it all look like a piece of cake, according to ABC11.



 

Many years ago, Edith worked as a dance teacher and would participate in line dancing shows with her friends back in the day. Some of the grace from her dancing experience spills onto her weightlifting technique as well.

As the centenarian spoke about how she started off weightlifting, she revealed that her friend, Carmen Gutworth, was the one who took her to the gym and introduced her to it when Edith was 91 years old.

Source: Guinness World Records

"While I was watching those ladies doing their thing, I thought I just as well should pick up a few bars, and I did," Edith said, according to Guinness World Records. "Going on a regular basis, I found that I was enjoying it, and I was challenging myself to get a little bit better and a little bit better. Before long, I was part of the team."

Soon enough, Edith began following the applause and started lifting at competitions. Carmen recalled one moment at a competition and said, "She bent down and picked it up as if it were her purse. She will not quit and anything that’s hard, it makes her more determined."

Source: Guinness World Records

Once the trophies started coming, there was no stopping Edith.

"As long as I could get a little bit of applause, I was happier each I time I got more and more applause," Edith shared. "Once people found out I was in my nineties and I was doing all of these things, it got to be more noticeable. People got to pay attention more."

When she was honored by the Guinness World Records, she made her family absolutely proud. "We knew she probably was one of the oldest but were shocked (and very proud of her) to be told she holds a world record," said Edith’s daughter, Honey Cottrell. "Our entire family is honored that our mother is a record holder, and Guinness World Records has given her this honor."

Source: Guinness World Records

Currently, Edith is a mother of five, a grandmother of 11, a great-grandmother of 10, and a great-great-grandmother of two. Her passion and attitude are an inspiration to many, and she loves proving people wrong when they say she cannot do something.

"I’m kind of annoying," Edith told New York Post. "Tell me I can’t do something, and I will prove that I can. That’s more or less or my attitude."

For her 100th birthday, Edith wore a golden dress and line-danced to New York, New York with her friends beside her. As she looks forward to hopefully bringing home another trophy in November, she said: "There’s nothing more that I can ask for than to open my eyes in the morning and know God gave me another day. You can’t ask for more than that."



 

Cover image source: Guinness World Records

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