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Matthew McConaughey says he'd consider running for governor if it means he can bring divided Americans together again

Matthew McConaughey says he'd consider running for governor if it means he can bring divided Americans together again

"I want to get behind personal values to rebind our social contracts with each other as Americans, as people again."

Matthew McConaughey, whose catchphrase "Alright, alright, alright" is imitated by many across the globe, surprised many recently by saying that he wouldn't be opposed to run for governor of Texas. The native of the Lone Star state added that it would, however, it would be"'up to the people", according to KHOU11.

The Award-winning actor, in an interview on The Hugh Hewitt Show podcast, said, "Look, politics seems to be a broken business to me right now," but said, "When politics redefines its purpose, I could be a hell of a lot more interested."

Though the interview was focused on his new memoir Greenlight, McConaughey discussed politics as well. He spoke about other actors who had moved from Hollywood to politics, including Arnold Schwarzenegger and Clint Eastwood. "You know, I still question how much you can really get done in politics, and I don’t know if politics is my avenue to get what maybe I am best equipped to get done," he said.

Matthew McConaughey looks on, on the grid before the F1 Grand Prix of USA at Circuit of The Americas on November 03, 2019 in Austin, Texas. (Photo by Mark Thompson/Getty Images)

He also spoke about how divided the current American political landscape was, especially post Joe Biden's Presidency win. "This country’s got to stabilize first before we start to say, 'OK, here’s how we’re marching out of this together forward.'"

According to The Hill, the actor also spoke about what are the values he would endorse if he were to step into politics. "I want to get behind personal values to rebind our social contracts with each other as Americans, as people again," McConaughey told Hewitt. The country, he said, doesn't "trust each other."

"That leads to us not trust in ourselves, which if that becomes epidemic, then we’ve got anarchy," the actor said. "I’m all for the individual, and I think it’s for — to make collective change that the individual needs to look in the mirror and say, 'How can I be a little bit better today?'"



 

Back in 2016, when Donald Trump had won the elections, McConaughey had said, "A lot of people that I know on the far left were in denial after he had become the president." Continuing, he said, "I remember saying, well look, regardless of [Trump's] politics, in the very first question, what do we say in America is successful? What do we give credit and respect?" McConaughey asked. "The top two things are money and fame. And I said guys, just on a very base level, Trump has those, so I don’t know why we should be so surprised that he got elected." That observation sure is true, however brutally honest it may be.



 

In an interview with Esquire recently, for what seemed to be promotional work for his memoir, his political views seem very centrist. "We're really not thinking about a long view about where we're going and how to get there, you know? The far left doesn't seem to want to ever be able to admit the evil that mankind can possess, and the far right doesn't want to think past tomorrow… I want to propose meeting in the middle as a dare. I dare you to meet in the middle, instead of like, Oh, that's a place of great compromise. I dare you to come over here and have a look, to have to meet in the middle, at least have to look at the opposition in the eye. At least shake their hand and go, Well what can we agree on?"

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