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Woman warns pets owners of "silent killer" in their homes that killed her beloved dog

Woman warns pets owners of "silent killer" in their homes that killed her beloved dog

For Samantha Carress, it was worse living with the fact that her 2-year-old Golden Retriever named Luna's death could have been avoided.

A Wisconsin family was left devastated after being forced to put down their beloved pet dog. For Samantha Carress, it was worse living with the fact that her 2-year-old Golden Retriever named Luna's death could have been avoided. Now she is doing everything to raise awareness about the silent "dog killers" in the household of pet owners. 

Carress explained how her pooch, like any other dog, loved playing and digging around for delectable snacks. She would bite into anything that seemed edible. One day, when no one was looking, Luna ended up devouring an entire packet of lemon-flavored chewing gum. What the poor dog did not know was that the delicious food was artificially flavored with Xylitol, a deadly poison for dogs. 

Xylitol is a sugar-free sweetener that is added to some food items because of its sweet sugary properties minus the extra calories. It can be found in "gum, some hard candies, chocolate, table syrup, jams, jellies, baked goods, cough syrup, vitamins, some nut butters, over-the-counter medications," according to WebMD. While it is mostly safe for human consumption, "xylitol can be toxic to dogs, even in small amounts."



 

Unfortunately, Samantha and her spouse were not aware of this and they quickly went into a state of panic when Luna fell ill. Soon her liver function failed and she dropped to the ground, according to KPIX CBS SF Bay Area Luna's vet told them that the only remote possibility of saving her was a $20,000 operation. The pair, however, did not have the financial resources to afford this treatment. With no other choice in sight the family decided to put down their loving puppy. 

Ever since losing her pet, Samantha has become very careful of the edibles she purchases for her home. She has made it a point to read the contents labels for Xylitol and no longer buys products that contain this chemical to protect her other pet from harm. 

Authorities claim that Xylitol-poisoning in pets has increased a lot in less than 10 years. The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) revealed that they have received 82 calls in 2004 regarding Xylitol poisoning as compared to 3727 in 2014. Thus it is more important than ever for owners to check their food items in cabinets and keep Xylitol-containing products away from their dogs and other pets.

Cover image source: YouTube Screenshot | KPIX CBS SF Bay Area

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