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Woman who was given three months to live after cancer diagnosis is now in remission: "It's a miracle"

Woman who was given three months to live after cancer diagnosis is now in remission: "It's a miracle"

During a recent extensive surgery, Nottingham surgeons removed part of her bowel while performing a full hysterectomy. A few weeks ago, she was informed that the test results were clear.

Caroline Guy's world came crashing down in January 2020 when a sudden illness turned out to be cancer. The 56-year-old was in Saudi Arabia visiting her husband, Adam, when she fell seriously sick. "I was in pain walking, I looked seven months pregnant, and I woke up one night and was violently sick. I just felt horrendous," she recalled. 

She was immediately taken to a hospital where a surgeon diagnosed her with cancer and revealed that it had already spread to her ovaries and liver. Caroline was given three to four months to live. Soon after, she began a course of chemotherapy and by September she traveled back home to Nottingham to see her daughter.  

Following a few more rounds of chemotherapy, her tumor unexpectedly shrunk to a stage where surgery was a viable option. During a recent extensive surgery, Nottingham surgeons removed part of her bowel while performing a full hysterectomy. A few weeks ago, she learned that her test results came back clear.



 

"The surgeon looked at me and said you've got no cancer. I said 'Are you sure?' I just couldn't believe it. It's a miracle," she expressed according to BBC. "It cost £110,000 for my treatment in Saudi - my husband's retirement fund - because I didn't have insurance. The money it cost for private care - even though it was amazing - it doesn't touch what I've had done here with the NHS, and the NHS gets such a bashing."

Doctors will be constantly monitoring Caroline for at least 5 years. "Caroline had extensive chemotherapy and surgical resection of multiple organs, which is physically demanding but also presents a significant psychological burden and carries the potential for serious complications," explained her surgeon Alastair Simpson.

Simpson went on to talk about the availability of advanced cancer care in Nottingham which will help keep Caroline's cancer in check. "Nottingham has an advanced cancer service which is able to coordinate this care and support her through the process. It has been a pleasure to be part of the team to manage her from a life-threatening cancer diagnosis into her current state of remission and surveillance," shared Simpson. 



 

 

Cover image source: Facebook | Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust

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